How To Get a Better Singing Voice In 4 Steps

Hello happy singers, this is Katarina from How 2 Improve Singing and in today’s video, I want to talk about 4 steps that you need to take in order to improve your singing voice.

If you skip one of these steps, you are running a risk that you will be dissapointed by not reaching your goal. So keep on watching.

Let’s talk about your goals and how to achieve them in 4 steps. How to get a better singing voice?

Before I name the first step, it’s kind of obvious that you need to have a goal. Let me give you some examples of good goals. For example, extending your vocal range by a semi-tone in two weeks. Learning a new song for an audition in May or improving your breath support for a long phrase that you are working on right now in your repertoire.

Step 1 is to have the right mindset. Some goals have a deadline. So your mindset is very set on that goal. But some goals don’t have deadlines and you just want to improve one of your singing skills. Sometimes, if you don’t have a deadline, your mind is not 100% sold on the goal and you may actually sabotage yourself. You may think: “I am not an opera singer, I don’t need to improve my breath support.” Or you can find other ways to sabotage yourself and not to work on your goals.

Step 2 is to have the right knowledge. This step simply means that you have to have a basic knowledge and understanding of your vocal instrument. And I am not telling you to learn all the muscles and bones and cartilages and ligaments. I am telling you to have some basic understanding of your body, of your vocal instrument, what it looks like on the inside andhow it works.

Step 3 is self-exploration. You can have the best teacher, you can have the best vocal coach, you can have an amazing book but if you do not apply the given advice to your own body, you will not progress and you may not reach your goal. We are all different and what works for me may not work for you. Or the sensations and movements associated with certain skill may be very different for you and may be very different for me. So you need to take that piece of advice and try it on yourself. You need to experiment, you really need to find what works for you. Self-exploration then leads to self-discovery, which are very exciting. This is when you learn something for the very first time.

Self-discoveries then lead to self-awareness and with self-awareness you can go to step 4, practice. You, as singers, know a lot about practice. Practice makes permanent. Practice does not make perfect. Perfection and singing don’t go together. Practice makes the new skill that you discovered in step 3 and makes it a habit, or makes it automatic. So that you don’t need to think about it when you perform or when you sing in front of the audience.

These are the four steps that you need to take in order to achieve your singing goal. 4 Steps to a better singing voice. If you skip one of these steps, you may be very dissapointed by not achieving your goal.

Very often singers go right to step 4 and don’t pay attention to their mindset, knowledge or self-exploration. These singers follow instructions and they practice their arpegios or some exercises or scales. But if they need to troubleshoot or apply the new skill to a different condition, then they may have a problem.

And that’s all for today. Please click the like button if you liked this video, share it with your friends and don’t forget to subscribe.

Thank you for watching and I will see you in the next video. Until that time, happy singing and happy goal getting. Bye!

Link to this video: https://youtu.be/VHIU4nF_Mp4

Where is the Diaphragm Located? Practical Tips for Singers

Happy singers!

Katarina here again from How 2 Improve Singing. The diaphragm seems to be the most common word that singers talk about. How many times have you heard:

“Breathe from your diaphragm”

“Support the sound with the diaphragm” or

“Use diaphragmatic breathing”?

Let’s end this madness and get the facts straight.

In today’s video, I will be talking about the diaphragm. What is it? Where is the diaphragm located and what does the diaphragm do when we sing? By the end of this video, you will recognize why statements like “breathe from the diaphragm” or “support the sound with the diaphragm” do not make sense. Let’s start.

I am going to tell you right away that the role of the diaphragm is overrated among singers. I believe that this craziness about the diaphragm is rooted in poor knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of our body. We are going to change that in this video.

What is the diaphragm?

The diaphragm is a dome-shaped muscle. The shape can be compared to a parachute. The diaphragm is the major muscle of inhalation because it is responsible for about 70% of inhaled air.

Where is the diaphragm located?

The diaphragm spans across the bottom of the ribcage and separates the chest cavity from the abdominal cavity. The diaphragm is attached to your spine at the back, to the bottom ribs on the sides and to the breastbone at the front.

What does the diaphragm do when we sing?

During inhalation, the diaphragm contracts, flattens and moves downward. This is when the diaphragm is hard at work. As a result of the downward movement of the diaphragm, the space in the lungs increases and air enters the lungs. At the same time, the diaphragm pushes on the inner organs in our abdomen. You can observe this direct effect of the descending diaphragm as your belly gets pushed out during inhalation.

During exhalation, the diaphragm relaxes and returns up to its dome-shaped relaxed position. Yes, the diaphragm is relaxing when we exhale or make sound! As a result of the diaphragm moving up, the inner abdominal organs also return to their “normal” position. You can observe this as your belly moves in. The lungs decrease in volume, which causes air to leave the lungs.

As you can see, the diaphragm is important for breathing, especially for inhalation. But we use many other body parts when singing, so start paying attention to those too! For example, to your chest, sides of your body, your back, your body position, your larynx …

Today, I shared some practical tips about the diaphragm with you. But knowing about the diaphragm is only one aspect of good breathing technique. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download your free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe so that you don’t miss my weekly videos. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video. Happy singing!

Link to the video: https://youtu.be/9yqkVofkdt0

Posture for Singers: Singing While Sitting


Hello happy singers,

I am Katarina from How 2 Improve Singing.

This statement is probably no news to you: “Optimal body posture is crucial for powerful and tension-free singing.” But what is the best sitting posture for singers? In this video, I am going to describe 4 areas of your body that you need to pay attention to so that you avoid strain and tension when singing while sitting. Keep watching.

Many singers sit when singing. They may be sitting to play their instrument, such as piano, or guitar. Choir members may sit during their choir practices. Some singers may sit on a stool when singing to create a special atmosphere.

How do you keep optimal posture when singing so that your vocal instrument has the ideal conditions for powerful singing without tension?

These are four areas of the sitting posture for singers that you should pay attention to:

Sit Bones

Sit bones are two bumps at the bottom of your pelvis. Put both hands under your bottom and feel the two bumps. They should be pointing down. Rock back and forth on these bones and find the position when they are pointing down. If you get this right, the rest of the body will follow: your pelvis, spine and the head will be well aligned. This position will give you stability and mobility at the same time.

Pelvis

If your sit bones are pointing down, the pelvis will be in the most optimal position.

If you tilt your pelvis backward, your back becomes curved and the front part of your body is shortened. This prevents the diaphragm from descending fully.

If you tilt your pelvis forward, the spine will be overarched, which creates tension in your body.

Chest and Shoulders

If your sit bones are pointing down, your breastbone will move up and your chest becomes open. You want to feel tall and wide. Your chest position is flexible so that it can expand in all directions freely with every breath and your diaphragm can descend fully during inhalation.

Head

Keep your head aligned with the rest of the body. Keep the chin parallel with the floor. This can be challenging when you are playing an instrument as you may need to watch your fingers playing the piano or guitar strings. Master your instrument (piano or guitar) so that you don’t need to watch your hands all the time. If you need to look down, use the joint between your skull and your spine to tilt your head down. Do not bend the whole neck to look down. This will restrict the movement of the larynx and vocal cord function.

Make sure that your microphone is positioned well so that you don’t have to stretch your neck or compromise your head and body position to reach it.

The biggest benefit of good posture when singing is the freedom of movement, whether it’s the movement of your body or your voice. In a well-aligned body, your muscles don’t have to work extra hard and there is no tension so that you can sing at your best.

In today’s video, I shared a few simple tips to achieve optimal sitting posture for singers. But this is just one aspect of good breathing technique. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download your free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe to this channel for my weekly videos. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Link to the video: https://youtu.be/i7ySIl5i3HQ

Correct Singing Posture: Breathing Exercise for Singers


Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing. One of the reasons why you run out of breath or sing with tension may be your inefficient chest position during singing. In today’s video, I am going to show you a simple breathing exercise for singers that will help you maintain correct singing posture so that you can effectively manage your breath and sing with freedom. Stay tuned.

Finding a medium-high chest posture is not that difficult. But maintaining it can be challenging, especially for those of us who habitually hunch over.

Let me recap what we know about correct singing posture, more specifically medium-high chest posture:

A medium-high chest posture is important for efficient breathing because it allows your ribcage to open, your lower ribs to move freely and your diaphragm to descend fully. This is essential for sufficient and efficient breath for a given sung phrase.

(If you did not know this, watch my other video, in which I talk more about chest position. Click on the link at the end of this video.)

This medium-high chest position should not change substantially throughout the exhalation phase, when you sing or breathe out. Your goal is to prevent collapsing of the chest when singing. If you notice that your breastbone is moving in and down (even a tiny bit) during singing, you are not keeping correct posture for singing. If you collapse your chest every time you breathe out, you will have to work hard to breathe in again and again. By the end of the song or exercise, you may feel exhausted. This fatigue may then lead to insufficient breaths, running out of air or even tension or strain.

Keeping your chest open is easier said than done, especially for those of us who sit at the computer a lot, who slouch on comfy couches or habitually slump over.

Here is a simple breathing exercise to strengthen the muscles that keep your chest up and open.

Step #1 Get a mirror.

Use a mirror to check for the movements of your breastbone. The mirror will give you immediate feedback on how you are doing. Watch for the slightest down or inward movement of the breastbone. You do not want to see this (show examples of what not to do).

Step #2 Find a medium-high chest posture.

Use the Hands-up technique to find the medium-high chest posture. Check out my other video, in which I demonstrated this technique.

Step #3 Inhale silently.

As you inhale, your torso is expanding in all directions: forward, sideways and even backward.

Step #4 Exhale while keeping your chest open.

As you are slowly exhaling focus on your breastbone. Imagine having a string attached to your breastbone pulling up. Watch yourself in the mirror and don’t let your chest collapse. Exhale for as long as you can while keeping your chest up.

Do a few repetitions every day and you are good to go. This exercise will help you strengthen the muscles that keep your chest up and open. It may take some time and slight discomfort while developing their strength.

In today’s video, I shared a simple breathing exercise for singers to strengthen the muscles to maintain a medium-high chest posture. But this is just one aspect of good breathing technique. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download your free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe so that you don’t miss my weekly videos. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Lin to the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3We8dpBAkA

Singing Posture: Medium-High Chest Posture


Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing.

You may not give too much thought to good posture when singing but in today’s video, you are going to learn why good singing posture, more specifically optimal chest posture, is essential for effective singing. I am also going to share an easy trick to finding your most optimal chest posture so that you can sing with freedom and power. Stay tuned.

O.K. Let’s talk about all the why’s, what’s and how’s of optimal singing posture.

Good posture is the starting point for effective breathing and singing. Yes, even before you take a breath or start singing, your body needs to be aligned optimally to function effectively.

A medium-high chest position is one part of overall good body alignment.

What does medium-high chest posture look and feel like?

Your breastbone is raised up and forward. Your shoulders are down and wide. The word “posture” sounds static but the truth is that the chest alignment is dynamic and gives you the freedom to move and sing without any tension. This alignment allows the ribcage to open and move freely with your breath. The lower ribs have the space to move and the diaphragm can descend fully. Now, you are able to take a sufficient and efficient breath needed for a sung phrase.

What is it not?

Soldier-like Position.

Many singers confuse medium-high chest posture with a rigid, soldier-like position. If you cannot move your breastbone higher, then your chest is too high. As a result, your body will compensate by curving your spine excessively and by moving your head out of alignment, which impedes the sound production.

Collapsed chest.

Many singers start with a collapsed chest and expand it with the first breath or with every breath they take. This is very laborious and can wear you out pretty quickly. It also creates tension in the upper torso and the neck area, which again may negatively affect your sound. A collapsed chest can be one of the reasons why you run out of breath when singing.

Hands-Up Technique.

Here is an easy trick to find a medium-high chest position. I like to call it the “Hands-Up Technique”.

Stretch your arms over your head while breathing normally and then bring the arms slowly down while keeping your chest up and open. Breathe normally, don’t hold your breath. Find a medium high chest position. Observe as your chest, the breastbone is up and forward. Voila! You just found a medium-high chest posture.

Remember that you need to establish this optimal singing posture even before you take a breath and start singing. Maintain this position throughout singing and don’t allow your chest to collapse. But that’s a topic for another video.

In today’s video, you learned about the medium-high chest posture, why it’s important for efficient singing and how to find it. But this is just one aspect of good breathing technique. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download your free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe for new videos every week.

Thanks for watching and I will see you soon.

Happy singing!

Link to video: https://youtu.be/7ZZkdM3xYGU

Proper Breathing for Singing: How Much Air Do I Need to Sing?


Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing.

You are a smart singer and you know that proper breathing technique is essential for efficient singing.

But how much air do you need to sing? How do you know that you are inhaling enough air to take you through a whole phrase?

The answer is easy and I will share it with you in this video. So stay tuned.

In this video, I am going to answer a common question asked by many singers: How much air do I need to sing?

A singer needs to take in as much air as it is required for a given sung phrase. This means that you need more air for long phrases and less air for short phrases. Also, you need more air for loud or breathy singing, and you need less air for high notes or soft singing.

Proper breathing for singing requires an inhalation of the right amount of air for a given phrase. Not too much and not too little.

And you may be surprised to know that it’s less than you think. Some singers, especially beginners, tend to take huge breaths. The problem with a big breath is that it creates tension in your vocal mechanism, in your body.

Let’s try it together.

Take a big breath. What do you feel? Do you feel like you want to burst? Do you feel the tension as you are trying to contain or control this huge amount of air?

I feel the tension right in my lower torso as well as in my throat. My throat shuts down as a result of the high air pressure under the vocal cords. And a closed throat is the last thing you want to do when singing. Strain in your throat affects the quality of your voice, which may become either strained or breathy.

Secondly, it is very difficult to control big volumes of air. It is much easier to manage small breaths.

So use small breaths and use proper breathing technique for singing to control the airflow going through the vocal cords.

If you are unable to sing the whole phrase in one breath, you have two choices. You can either take more breaths (if that makes sense) or you can gradually improve your breath management skills. Incorporate some breathing exercises into your regular vocal routine. Instead of asking how much air do I need, start asking yourself: how can I use my breath more efficiently?

And when someone tells you to take a deep breath, avoid doing this (demonstrate). Deep breathing does not mean a big breath that creates tension and straining. Watch my other videos to learn more about proper breathing for singers to avoid just that.

In this video, you learned about one small aspect of good breathing technique. But there is more to breathing for singing than the amount of air you inhale. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download your free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe for new videos every week. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Link to the Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EzUYvbgjOU

Breathing Exercises for Singing: The 360 Ring of Breath

Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing.

Every smart singer knows that it is crucial to take an efficient breath before singing a phrase.

But how do you inhale efficiently? In this video, I am going to share four easy steps that can transform your voice from week to powerful. Stay tuned.

In this video, I am going to explain how you can achieve the 360 Ring of Breath in 4 easy steps. “What the heck is the 360 ring of breath?” you ask. Let me explain.

You probably know that the diaphragm is an important breathing muscle. It is a dome-shaped muscle that moves down and flattens when we inhale. However, the way we inhale greatly impacts the function of the diaphragm.

The way we inhale can either:

  • prevent the diaphragm from descending fully, which results in shallow, inefficient and laborious breathing, not recommended for singing; or
  • allow the diaphragm to move down fully and efficiently. And that is exactly what we want to achieve when breathing for singing.

When we allow the whole torso to participate in inhalation, not just certain isolated parts of the body, we create ideal conditions for the diaphragm to work efficiently. I like to call it, the 360 Ring of Breath because it feels like a ring of air all around your body: in front, on the sides and even on the back.

You can create the 360 Ring of Breath in 4 easy steps. Let’s start.

Step one.

Put your hand on your upper stomach (between the bottom edge of your breastbone and your belly button). While maintaining a medium-high chest posture, inhale. You will feel the upper abdomen move out, which is caused by the diaphragm moving down.

Bonus tip.

If your upper abdomen is not moving out on inhalation, it is probably tensed. In order to achieve the movement, your abdomen has to be somewhat relaxed. Lie down on your back on the floor and put your hand on your belly. Relax and breathe normally. Observe how your belly is moving up with every new breath. Now stand up and replicate the same feeling and movement while standing up.

Step two.

Put your hands on the sides of your body. While maintaining a medium-high chest posture, inhale. Feel how your body is expanding sideways. The sides of your body and your lower ribcage play an important role in creating conditions, which allow the diaphragm to descend fully. If you are really serious about singing, pay attention to this part of the body.

Bonus tip.

If you don’t feel the sideway expansion, lie down on the floor facing down. Inhale in this position, and observe the sideway motion. Then stand up and replicate the same sensations while standing up.

Step three.

Put your hands on your back. While maintaining a medium-high chest posture, inhale. Observe a slight expansion in the back. The movement is small so pay close attention. Your back also plays an important role in breathing for singing.

Step four.

Once you are able to expand your body in these 3 different directions individually, coordinate all of these movements into one fluid motion that allows the diaphragm to function efficiently. While maintaining a medium-high chest posture, inhale and expand your torso in three directions: forward, sideways and backward.

Voila! The 360 Ring of Breath! Your diaphragm can now descend fully and your inhalation is efficient.

In today’s video, you learned about the 360 Ring of Breath, which allows the diaphragm to descend fully and function efficiently. If you master these 4 steps, you are on your way to a powerful voice. But this is just one aspect of good breathing technique. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video. Happy singing!

Link to the YouTube Video: https://youtu.be/bRE3umgjvkM

How to Improve Singing: Welcome!


Happy Singers!

Here is an inspirational video for you!

Transcript:

How to Improve Singing: Welcome!

You breathe.

Breath is

Life

Joy

Love

Song

You sing.

Singing is

Happiness

Pride

Sharing

Passion

Share you passion, life, joy, love, song, happiness, pride.

Breath is the engine for singing.

Welcome: How to Improve Singing

 

How to Improve Singing? I hear you – you want to take your singing to the next level. You are in the right place. Start by DOWNLOADING A COMPLETE BREATHING CHECKLIST HERE: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/breathe

What does singing mean to you?

I am Katarina and in this video, I will show you what singing means to me. It’s my life, my passion, my everything like the air we breathe.

And because you are a smart singer, you know that breath is the engine for singing. Without breath, there would be no sound.

Therefore, start transforming your singing by building foundational skill, which is good breathing technique. I will show you that good singing does not exist without good breathing.

If you think that breathing for singing is complicated or confusing, just stick around because I will show you that breathing for singing is none of those. You just need to learn a little bit more about your own body, your instrument to understand how breathing really works and then you will see and hear that breathing for singing is really simple.

But what is more important?

Good breathing for singing can take your singing skills to the next level. Many vocal difficulties, such as vocal breaks, limited vocal range, running out of air, gasping, tension and even vocal straining have their roots in poor breath control.

So stick around, check out my videos and be sure to subscribe as I post new videos every week. For more resources for singers, visit my website How 2 Improve Singing, which will give you more answers to the very first question you had: How to improve singing?

I created this channel and my website to inspire you to sing more, to share vocal wisdom and to challenge you to find your true voice. Happy breathing! Happy singing!

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DOWNLOAD A FREE BREATHING CHECKLIST HERE: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/breathe

SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/subscribe

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Website: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com

FB: http://www.facebook.com/singingroom

Twitter: https://twitter.com/singing_room

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/singingroom/

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Free resource for singers: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/breathing-for-singing-101/

Also watch this video: Inhale for Success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27zo5LTVA6w

 

Link: How to Improve Singing: Welcome! at https://youtu.be/hGgGhVk0dOY

Proper Breathing for Singers: Inhale for Success

Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing. In this video, I am going to tell you how to inhale so that you can sing with power and freedom. You may think that good inhalation is all about the diaphragm but is the diaphragm really as important for singing as people think? I’ll explain so stay tuned.

This video is all about efficient inhalation that gives you the power and flexibility to sing any note you want.

There are three steps.

Step one: Establish a medium-high chest position.

Before you take a breath and start singing, create ideal conditions for making a beautiful sound. It includes a well-aligned body posture with an open chest. Your breastbone is up, and your shoulders are wide and back. This is not a rigid or stiff posture. It’s a flexible and dynamic posture that allows your body to expand in all directions on inhalation.

Bonus tip.

Don’t lift your chest too high. If you cannot move your chest any higher it means that your chest posture is too high and there is probably some tension. So explore different chest positions and find the one that feels good to you.

It is absolutely critical that you maintain this position throughout singing. Do not allow your chest to collapse!

Step two. The 360 Ring of Breath.

This simply means that you allow your body to expand in all directions: forward, sideways and backward.

Let me explain.

Put your hand on your upper abdomen. When you inhale, this part of your body moves out.

Now put your hands on the sides of your body. When you inhale, the sides of your body move sideways.

Lastly, put your hands on your back. When you inhale, your back expands slightly.

When you coordinate these three movements into a simultaneous action during inhalation, you create ideal conditions for your diaphragm to descend fully.

Speaking about the diaphragm. You cannot really feel or touch your diaphragm and you cannot directly control your diaphragm. When your upper abdomen is moving out on inhalation, it is not the diaphragm that you see or feel moving. It is the abdominal wall and the inner organs that move as a direct effect of the descending diaphragm. And although the diaphragm is important for inhalation, stop focusing on the diaphragm!

Start paying attention to your chest, sides of the body and your back. You can see, feel, and control these body parts and create optimal conditions for the function of the diaphragm.

Step three. Inhale silently.

Effective inhalation is silent. If you hear your breath entering your body, something is not right. There is an obstacle somewhere along the way – it can be your tongue, your throat, or something else that obstruct the vocal tract and creates friction. So open up your instrument and breathe in silently.

And that is all for today. Three steps to better inhalation that leads to a strong and free sound. But there is more to good breathing technique than inhalation. Find out if you breathe correctly for singing. Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Link to the video: https://youtu.be/27zo5LTVA6w

Running Out of Breath When Singing? 5 Tips to Avoid Shortness of Breath While Singing

Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing. In today’s video, I am going to share 5 simple tips on how to avoid running out of air at the end of a sung phrase. I’ll tell you when to breathe during singing so that you don’t feel and sound like a runner crossing the finish line. Stay tuned.

Let’s talk about how to avoid running out of breath when singing. Here are 5 simple tips to follow:

Tip #1

Examine the notation of the song. Some songs have special markings that tell you exactly when to take a breath. A breath mark looks like a little comma placed above the staff.

Tip #2

Always mark places in your sheet music where you think you may need to breathe. If you don’t use sheet music, use a sheet with the song’s lyrics instead and mark down when to breathe. You will end up with sentences or phrases that are sung with one breath.

Bonus tip: After you have marked your sheet music, say each phrase out loud in one breath. Connect the words in a legato style so that the air is moving constantly throughout the phrase. (Demonstrate)

Tip #3

After you have marked your music, sing the song a few times paying close attention to your breathing. Adjust your markings. Move or add more places to breathe.

Generally, it makes sense to breathe in when:

  • there is a rest in the music,
  • at the end of a sentence
  • at the end of a phrase
  • at the end of a thought.

Never breathe in the middle of a word or a phrase. That sounds awkward.

Tip #4

Practice singing the song while following the markings. Once you add some dynamics and stylistic elements to your singing, it may be necessary to adjust the breath markings again as louder parts or breathy singing may require additional air supply.

Tip #5

Add some breathing exercises to your vocal practice routine. The more you practice breathing, the better you get at managing your breath for singing. With practice, you’ll be able to hold notes for a longer time.

But don’t forget that singing is not a competition. So initially, take more breaths and as you get better, you’ll require fewer breaths.

In today’s video, you learned 5 simple tips to avoid running out of air when singing. However, good breathing technique which allows a singer to sing with power and flexibility is about more than not running out of air. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

YouTube video Link: https://youtu.be/spSog7GFBR8