How to Improve Singing: Welcome!


Happy Singers!

Here is an inspirational video for you!

Transcript:

How to Improve Singing: Welcome!

You breathe.

Breath is

Life

Joy

Love

Song

You sing.

Singing is

Happiness

Pride

Sharing

Passion

Share you passion, life, joy, love, song, happiness, pride.

Breath is the engine for singing.

Welcome: How to Improve Singing

 

How to Improve Singing? I hear you – you want to take your singing to the next level. You are in the right place. Start by DOWNLOADING A COMPLETE BREATHING CHECKLIST HERE: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/breathe

What does singing mean to you?

I am Katarina and in this video, I will show you what singing means to me. It’s my life, my passion, my everything like the air we breathe.

And because you are a smart singer, you know that breath is the engine for singing. Without breath, there would be no sound.

Therefore, start transforming your singing by building foundational skill, which is good breathing technique. I will show you that good singing does not exist without good breathing.

If you think that breathing for singing is complicated or confusing, just stick around because I will show you that breathing for singing is none of those. You just need to learn a little bit more about your own body, your instrument to understand how breathing really works and then you will see and hear that breathing for singing is really simple.

But what is more important?

Good breathing for singing can take your singing skills to the next level. Many vocal difficulties, such as vocal breaks, limited vocal range, running out of air, gasping, tension and even vocal straining have their roots in poor breath control.

So stick around, check out my videos and be sure to subscribe as I post new videos every week. For more resources for singers, visit my website How 2 Improve Singing, which will give you more answers to the very first question you had: How to improve singing?

I created this channel and my website to inspire you to sing more, to share vocal wisdom and to challenge you to find your true voice. Happy breathing! Happy singing!

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DOWNLOAD A FREE BREATHING CHECKLIST HERE: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/breathe

SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/subscribe

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Website: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com

FB: http://www.facebook.com/singingroom

Twitter: https://twitter.com/singing_room

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/singingroom/

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Free resource for singers: http://tips.how2improvesinging.com/breathing-for-singing-101/

Also watch this video: Inhale for Success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27zo5LTVA6w

 

Link: How to Improve Singing: Welcome! at https://youtu.be/hGgGhVk0dOY

Proper Breathing for Singers: Inhale for Success

Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing. In this video, I am going to tell you how to inhale so that you can sing with power and freedom. You may think that good inhalation is all about the diaphragm but is the diaphragm really as important for singing as people think? I’ll explain so stay tuned.

This video is all about efficient inhalation that gives you the power and flexibility to sing any note you want.

There are three steps.

Step one: Establish a medium-high chest position.

Before you take a breath and start singing, create ideal conditions for making a beautiful sound. It includes a well-aligned body posture with an open chest. Your breastbone is up, and your shoulders are wide and back. This is not a rigid or stiff posture. It’s a flexible and dynamic posture that allows your body to expand in all directions on inhalation.

Bonus tip.

Don’t lift your chest too high. If you cannot move your chest any higher it means that your chest posture is too high and there is probably some tension. So explore different chest positions and find the one that feels good to you.

It is absolutely critical that you maintain this position throughout singing. Do not allow your chest to collapse!

Step two. The 360 Ring of Breath.

This simply means that you allow your body to expand in all directions: forward, sideways and backward.

Let me explain.

Put your hand on your upper abdomen. When you inhale, this part of your body moves out.

Now put your hands on the sides of your body. When you inhale, the sides of your body move sideways.

Lastly, put your hands on your back. When you inhale, your back expands slightly.

When you coordinate these three movements into a simultaneous action during inhalation, you create ideal conditions for your diaphragm to descend fully.

Speaking about the diaphragm. You cannot really feel or touch your diaphragm and you cannot directly control your diaphragm. When your upper abdomen is moving out on inhalation, it is not the diaphragm that you see or feel moving. It is the abdominal wall and the inner organs that move as a direct effect of the descending diaphragm. And although the diaphragm is important for inhalation, stop focusing on the diaphragm!

Start paying attention to your chest, sides of the body and your back. You can see, feel, and control these body parts and create optimal conditions for the function of the diaphragm.

Step three. Inhale silently.

Effective inhalation is silent. If you hear your breath entering your body, something is not right. There is an obstacle somewhere along the way – it can be your tongue, your throat, or something else that obstruct the vocal tract and creates friction. So open up your instrument and breathe in silently.

And that is all for today. Three steps to better inhalation that leads to a strong and free sound. But there is more to good breathing technique than inhalation. Find out if you breathe correctly for singing. Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Link to the video: https://youtu.be/27zo5LTVA6w

Running Out of Breath When Singing? 5 Tips to Avoid Shortness of Breath While Singing

Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing. In today’s video, I am going to share 5 simple tips on how to avoid running out of air at the end of a sung phrase. I’ll tell you when to breathe during singing so that you don’t feel and sound like a runner crossing the finish line. Stay tuned.

Let’s talk about how to avoid running out of breath when singing. Here are 5 simple tips to follow:

Tip #1

Examine the notation of the song. Some songs have special markings that tell you exactly when to take a breath. A breath mark looks like a little comma placed above the staff.

Tip #2

Always mark places in your sheet music where you think you may need to breathe. If you don’t use sheet music, use a sheet with the song’s lyrics instead and mark down when to breathe. You will end up with sentences or phrases that are sung with one breath.

Bonus tip: After you have marked your sheet music, say each phrase out loud in one breath. Connect the words in a legato style so that the air is moving constantly throughout the phrase. (Demonstrate)

Tip #3

After you have marked your music, sing the song a few times paying close attention to your breathing. Adjust your markings. Move or add more places to breathe.

Generally, it makes sense to breathe in when:

  • there is a rest in the music,
  • at the end of a sentence
  • at the end of a phrase
  • at the end of a thought.

Never breathe in the middle of a word or a phrase. That sounds awkward.

Tip #4

Practice singing the song while following the markings. Once you add some dynamics and stylistic elements to your singing, it may be necessary to adjust the breath markings again as louder parts or breathy singing may require additional air supply.

Tip #5

Add some breathing exercises to your vocal practice routine. The more you practice breathing, the better you get at managing your breath for singing. With practice, you’ll be able to hold notes for a longer time.

But don’t forget that singing is not a competition. So initially, take more breaths and as you get better, you’ll require fewer breaths.

In today’s video, you learned 5 simple tips to avoid running out of air when singing. However, good breathing technique which allows a singer to sing with power and flexibility is about more than not running out of air. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

YouTube video Link: https://youtu.be/spSog7GFBR8

Singing Tips and Tricks: Breathing through the Mouth or Nose?


Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing.

Should you breathe through the nose, through the mouth, or through the mouth and the nose at the same time when singing?

If you think that one of these methods is better than the others, then stay tuned because in this video, I am going to tell you what really matters when inhaling for singing.

In this video, I am going tell you why the method you use to breathe in is not as important as the final result. Let me explain.

When you ask a group of people “How to inhale for singing?” some will tell you to breathe through the nose, some will swear by breathing through the mouth, and yet, some people will advise to breathe through both mouth and nose.

I believe that we are all individuals and what works for me may not work for you.

The important part is that the final result should be a silent, quick and sufficient inhalation.

Let’s explore all three methods with the end result in mind.

Breathing through the nose.

This method keeps the air moist but it can be noisy and slow.

Breathe in through your nose only if you have enough time, for example at the beginning of the song or after a long pause.

Bonus tip

Breathing through the nose is definitely a preferred type of breathing at rest because air passing through the nose warms up and becomes moist, which helps to keep your airways healthy.

Breathing through the mouth.

This method can have a drying effect on your vocal tract but it is quick and quiet.

If you breathe through the mouth when singing, keep a water bottle close by to prevent dryness.

Breathing throught he nose and mouth at the same time.

Breathing through the nose and mouth simultaneously can be quick, sufficient and quiet without the drying effect.

However, this type of breathing is most challenging and requires practice.

My recommendation is to try all these methods and decide for yourself. Use one method or a combination of all.

Keep in mind that the outcome is more important than the method you use.

In today’s video, you have learned the advantages and disadvantages of breathing through the nose and mouth.

But inhalation is only one small part of good breathing technique that makes singing powerful. To help you understand if you are breathing correctly for singing, I prepared a complete breathing checklist for you.

Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Link to the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaG0F2inRo0

How to Improve Your Singing Voice

Hello happy singers!

I am Katarina, the founder of How 2 Improve Singing.

Do any of these thoughts sound familiar:

Am I really improving?

Is it possible to develop MY voice?

When will I hear a difference in my singing?

I just don’t seem to progress …

If you are a singer who often doubts your own growth, then stick around. In this video, I am going to explain what you can do to grow every day and see your own progress. So stay tuned.

 

In this video, I am going to show you how to make progress in 3 simple steps and recognize your progress every time you practice.

When I ask singers to identify a specific goal to work on, they present me with noble aspirations like these:

I want to sing with more power and no strain.

I want to know everything about singing.

I want to be a better vocalist.

I want to be in a West End musical.

Or, I want to have better breath control.

Nothing wrong with dreaming big. I am all for big visions, but there are a few problems with these goals.

What does it mean to sing with more power? And do you want to sing one note with more power or a whole song?

How can you learn “everything” about singing? Is it possible?

How do you measure “a better vocalist”?

In what time frame do you want to be a part of the West End scene – this year, 5 years from now or this life-time?

No wonder that singers questions their progress …

What is the solution? The following 3 steps.

Step 1. Set SMART goals.

When I say smart, I mean S.M.A.R.T. goals, which is an acronym for specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely goals. Let me explain.

Specific.

Set specific goals. Vague or broad goals like “I want to learn everything” do not develop specific skills. Specific goals, such as “I will read one book about singing” or “I will use breath support to sing the first verse of my song”, give your effort a specific direction.

Measurable.

Set goals that you can measure. Ask yourself how long, how many or how much and incorporate these answers into your goals. Use words like 30 seconds, five repetitions, one semi-tone, first verse … You get the idea.

Achievable.

Choose goals that you can actually achieve. Know your limitations and do not aim for goals that are beyond your physical, emotional or practical limits.

Are you ready to sing with vibrato? Are you trying to sing notes that are way out of your vocal range? Can you handle a big audience?

Realistic.

Set goals that you can realistically achieve in a realistic time frame.

A skill that is only one step ahead of your current skill is realistic. For example, extend your range one semi-tone at a time. Or … first, use good breath support while holding one note, only once achieved, use it to sing a 3-note scale. Take one step at a time.

Timely.

Set a time frame, in which you can achieve your goal. For example a week, over 5 practice sessions, or by January.

So now you know how to set SMART goals. Go ahead and write one down.

Step 2. Regular practice routine.

Every smart singer knows that regular practice leads to continued growth and singing success.

Develop your practice routine around the SMART goal you created in step 1. Schedule your practices in your daytimer, diary or organizer. Be very specific, for example on Monday at 10 am, Tuesday at 2 pm etc. And keep your appointments!

Step 3. Keep a practice journal.

At the end of every practice session, reflect on your progress.

Have you achieved your goal or not yet?

What do you have to do next to get closer to your goal?

Do you need an extra step?

Write down your observations, including what went well and what needs more practice. If you have achieved your goal, give yourself a pat on the back or celebrate.

Don’t forget to set another goal to follow tomorrow.

And that’s it. 3 steps to making progress because the goal is not perfection, it is making progress.

Now you know how to set SMART goals and progress every time you practice. If you need help to set goals around your breathing technique, I prepared a breathing checklist for you. Click the link in the description below the video to download a free breathing checklist.

If you like this video, hit the like button below, share it with your friends, and be sure to subscribe. Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next video.

Happy singing!

Link to the video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/eDxsPeMNEJ8